Série de Prière: Waiting

There’s something very special about waiting prayer. When practiced with the right motives, it can become the core of your prayer life — and a very important part at that.

What is it?

Waiting prayer is taking time to be still before the Lord. This concept is repeated over and over again in Scripture (Ps. 25:5, 25:21, 27:14, 37:7, 37:9, 39:7, 62:5, 130:5; Isa. 40:31; Lam. 3:25-26; Hos. 12:6 — to name a few). When you quiet your soul and focus on the Lord, you are expectant. You let Him love you as you worship Him and you expect that He will reveal Himself to you. If you’re not used to internal prayer, waiting prayer is a great place to start.

“Truly my soul silently waits for God; from Him comes my salvation.” Ps. 62:1

The more you wait on the Lord, the more sensitive you become to the Holy Spirit. You may feel nothing — in fact, for a while, I can almost guarantee you that you will feel nothing — but the simple act of quieting your soul before God will inevitably cause you to sense Him more.

The Bible commands us to wait on the Lord (Ps. 27:14, Hosea 12:6). It is the beginning of trust: you admit your own human weakness and look to the Lord for strength. And David tells us that, “those who wait on the Lord, they shall inherit the earth.” (Ps. 37:9)

Practical Steps

Waiting prayer can be practiced in a prayer room or in your bedroom. Just be somewhere that you’re not likely to be interrupted.

  1. Start with worshiping God — out loud or internally — and read the Word.
  2. Close your eyes and begin to clear your mind of distracting thoughts. Focus, in expectancy, on the Lord. (If you want, ask God to give you a mental picture to help you focus.)
  3. Then just wait. Don’t ask questions, try not to get distracted — just wait. Honestly, even though I’ve been doing this for 2 years, it often takes a half hour for my soul to quiet down so I can hear the Holy Spirit’s voice clearly. We get so busy during the day that it takes us a while to slow down.

Start with a few minutes at a time. If you fall asleep, just pick up where you left off; there’s no shame in that. You will soon find that you want to wait on the Lord longer and longer because His presence is so addicting.

Recommended Reading

Jaeson Ma, a campus revivalist, has posted his “Waiting Prayer” chapter from his book on his blog — it is an excellent description and includes his own personal testimony.

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This post is a part of a series on different types of prayer. Click here to read the rest of the series.

Romans 15:1-4

We then who are strong ought to bear with the scruples of the weak, and not to please ourselves. Let each of us please his neighbor for his good, leading to edification…For whatever things were written before were written for our learning, that we through the patience and comfort of the Scriptures might have hope.”

I saw these verses through a different light tonight. I was reading Romans 15 with the intention of praying for the church of Roseville (using Paul’s prayer in verses 5-6 and 13), but I quickly saw that I had no idea why Paul was praying to, “the God of patience and comfort”. When I asked the Lord about this, I felt like the answer was elsewhere in the chapter. What I discovered pleasantly surprised me: I began to see that in the first 4 verses of the chapter, Paul was speaking to the mature Romans and encouraging them to be patient with their immature companions.

I have to laugh when the Lord reminds me of how closely He is watching me. I have been reflecting recently on how I have matured in the past year and been a little embarrassed when I see where I was then. I even told one of my leaders that I am amazed at the grace he had for me when I was so immature! Now, I am around some people who are in the exact place I was 1 year ago…Do I have grace for them? Well, I will admit that most of the time I just get annoyed by their immaturities.

With that insight, I’m sure you can get a little humor out of the Lord showing me this verse tonight. It’s nothing new that I get annoyed at people who are less mature than me. Paul advised the Romans to have grace for them, to edify them, and to remember patience and comfort (encouragement). This was the Lord’s answer to me also, and revealed to me why Paul prayed to the God of patience and comfort for unity within His Church.